Asian Watercolor Print

$150.00

Asian Watercolor Print. This wonderful piece measures 72 1/2 inches tall and 29 inches wide. The brilliant colors of this piece will brighten any room. While elegant for a formal dining room this would also be a great piece for a bedroom.

Full Disclosure: This piece is in good to fair condition. This is due to a couple of wrinkles/creases on the top and bottom. They are certainly not hard folds but we want you to be aware.

Availability: In stock

SKU: 322 Category: Tags: , ,

Asian Watercolor Print. This wonderful piece measures 72 1/2 inches tall and 29 inches wide. The brilliant colors of this piece will brighten any room. While elegant for a formal dining room this would also be a great piece for a bedroom.

“A significant difference between Eastern and Western painting lies in the format. Unlike Western paintings, which are hung on walls and continuously visible to the eye, most Chinese paintings are not meant to be on constant view but are brought out to be seen only from time to time. This occasional viewing has everything to do with format.

A predominant format of Chinese painting is the handscroll, a continuous roll of paper or silk of varying length on which an image has been painted, and which, when not being viewed, remains rolled up. Ceremony and anticipation underlie the experience of looking at a handscroll. When in storage, the painting itself is several layers removed from immediate view, and the value of a scroll is reflected in part by its packaging. Scrolls are generally kept in individual wooden boxes that bear an identifying label. Removing the lid, the viewer may find the scroll wrapped in a piece of silk and, unwrapping the silk, encounters the handscroll bound with a silken cord that is held in place with a jade or ivory toggle. After undoing the cord, one begins the careful process of unrolling the scroll from right to left, pausing to admire and study it, shoulder-width section by section, rerolling a section before proceeding to the next one.

The experience of seeing a scroll for the first time is like a revelation. As one unrolls the scroll, one has no idea what is coming next: each section presents a new surprise. Looking at a handscroll that one has seen before is like visiting an old friend whom one has not seen for a while. One remembers the general appearance, the general outlines, of the image, but not the details. In unrolling the scroll, one greets a remembered image with pleasure, but it is a pleasure that is enhanced at each viewing by the discovery of details that one has either forgotten or never noticed before.”

From – www.metmuseum.org/

Weight.5 lbs
Dimensions10 × 6 × 57 in